The National Post published an article yesterday about the impossibility of Quebec separating from Canada (http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2012/07/04/andrew-coyne-the-separation-of-quebec-is-no-simple-matter/). Whether this is a well-reasoned argument is not up for debate on this page – I would say I’m 50/50 on the legitimacy of the points raised… what really struck me was the photo the National Post ran with the story:

The photo is actually of Quebecers celebrating St-Jean-Baptiste in Quebec City, but it is being used to illustrate both the cause of separatism discussed in the content of the column, and the student boycott movement with all the red squares you can see on the flag.

The caption is:

People wave Quebec flags during the St.Jean show on the Plaines of Abraham in Quebec City, Saturday June 23, 2012. St-Jean Baptiste is Quebec’s National day and is traditionally celebrated on the Plains of Abraham with a concert and a huge fire. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Francis Vachon.

In reality, that picture has nothing to do with separatism other than the oft-incorrect implication that if you wave a Quebec flag, you’re a separatist.

But it’s important that the link made by the editor who selected the photo is understood: The Quebec student boycott movement is funded and supported by Quebec’s unions and the Parti Québécois – all institutions that have no other objective than to destabilize and destroy the current government for their own, selfish gain.

The PQ’s very reason for existence is to destroy the society that allows it to exist, and the unions are fighting for bus drivers and blue collar workers to be able to strangle the working class with unreasonable salaries and benefits. Both stand to gain from the misguided students smashing windows, skipping class and publicly defying the government.

This movement is about destruction under the guise of peoples rights to post-secondary education.

I maintain that education is a right, not post-secondary education. University is supposed to be for the intellectual elite of society – not just anyone who figures “gee, I don’t know what to do with my life, I might as well get a philosophy degree.” That’s what career programs in Cegep are for.

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